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The Richest People in the World in 2023

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Richest People in the World in 2023

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The Richest People in the World in 2023

After witnessing record gains in wealth, ultra-high net worth individuals (UHNWIs) lost a combined $10 trillion last year.

A lagging stock market dented these fortunes against high interest rates, energy shocks, and economic uncertainty. But some of the world’s billionaires have flourished in this environment, posting sky-high revenues in spite of inflationary pressures.

With data from Forbes Real-Time Billionaires List, we feature a snapshot of the richest people in the world in 2023.

Luxury Mogul Takes Top Spot

The world’s richest person is France’s Bernard Arnault, the chief executive of LVMH.

With 75 brands, the luxury conglomerate owns Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior, and Tiffany. LVMH traces back to 1985, when Arnault cut his first major deal with the company by acquiring Christian Dior, a firm that was struggling with bankruptcy.

Fast-forward to today, and the company is seeing record profits despite challenging market conditions. Louis Vuitton, for instance, has doubled its sales in four years.

In the table below, we show the world’s 10 richest people with data as of May 31, 2023:

RankNameSourceNet Worth
June 2023
1Bernard Arnault & familyLVMH$215B
2Elon MuskTesla, SpaceX$196B
3Jeff BezosAmazon$142B
4Larry EllisonOracle$132B
5Bill GatesMicrosoft$114B
6Warren BuffettBerkshire Hathaway$112B
7Larry PageGoogle$105B
8Steve BallmerMicrosoft$101B
9Sergey BrinGoogle$100B
10Carlos Slim Helu & familyTelecom$99B

Elon Musk, the second-wealthiest person in the world has a net worth of $196 billion. In June, he stepped down as CEO of Twitter as Linda Yaccarino, a former marketing executive at NBCUniversal took over.

Third on the list is Jeff Bezos, followed by Oracle founder Larry Ellison. Oracle, a multi-billion dollar cloud provider, is partnering with Nvidia in its artificial intelligence (AI) supercomputing platform designed for enterprises across multiple industries.

Fifth on the list is Warren Buffett. In his annual letter to shareholders, he discussed how Berkshire Hathaway reported record operating profits despite economic headwinds. The company outperformed the S&P 500 Index by about 22% in 2022.

How Fortunes Have Changed

Given multiple economic crosscurrents, billionaire wealth has diverged over the last year. Arnault’s wealth has soared the fastest, at 36%, followed by Ellison at 25%.

Carlos Slim Helu, with double-digit wealth increases, runs the largest telecom firm in Latin America. A decade ago, Slim was the richest person on the planet.

Top 10 Richest People in the World Growth

Jeff Bezos has seen his wealth decline 17%, or $29 billion, the most across the top 10 richest.

So far this year, AI market euphoria has led fortunes in big tech to rebound, although many have not fully recovered. In 2022, the top 10 tech billionaires lost almost $500 billion in combined wealth.

Recent Shakeups in Asia

Among the most striking news for the world’s richest centers around Gautam Adani, formerly the richest person in Asia.

In January, Hindenburg Research, a short-selling firm, released a report claiming that the Adani Group engaged in stock manipulation and fraud. Specifically, the report alleged the firm used offshore accounts to launder money, artificially boost share prices, and hide losses.

The Adani Group, which owns India’s largest ports—along with ports in Australia, Sri Lanka, and Israel—lost $100 billion in value in the span of a few weeks.

Interestingly, very few Indian mutual funds hold significant shares in Adani Group, signaling a lack of confidence across India’s market, which was also cited in Hindenburg’s report.

As a result, Mukesh Ambani has climbed to Asia’s top spot, controlling a $84 billion empire that spans from oil and gas and renewable energy to telecom. His conglomerate, Reliance Industries is the largest company by market cap in India.

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Visualizing the $105 Trillion World Economy in One Chart

How much does each country contribute to the $105 trillion world economy in 2023, and what nations are seeing their nominal GDPs shrink?

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A chart showing the breakup of the world economy, organized by the size of each country's gross domestic product.

Visualizing the $105 Trillion World Economy in One Chart

By the end of 2023, the world economy is expected to have a gross domestic product (GDP) of $105 trillion, or $5 trillion higher than the year before, according to the latest International Monetary Fund (IMF) projections from its 2023 World Economic Outlook report.

In nominal terms, that’s a 5.3% increase in global GDP. In inflation-adjusted terms, that would be a 2.8% increase.

ℹ️ Gross Domestic Product (GDP) measures the total value of economic output—goods and services—produced within a given time frame by both the private and public sectors. All numbers used in this article, unless otherwise specified, are nominal figures, and do not account for inflation.

The year started with turmoil for the global economy, with financial markets rocked by the collapse of several mid-sized U.S. banks alongside persistent inflation and tightening monetary conditions in most countries. Nevertheless, some economies have proven to be resilient, and are expected to register growth from 2022.

Ranking Countries by Economic Size in 2023

The U.S. is expected to continue being the biggest economy in 2023 with a projected GDP of $26.9 trillion for the year. This is more than the sum of the GDPs of 174 countries ranked from Indonesia (17th) to Tuvalu (191st).

China stays steady at second place with a projected $19.4 trillion GDP in 2023. Most of the top-five economies remain in the same positions from 2022, with one notable exception.

India is expected to climb past the UK to become the fifth-largest economy with a projected 2023 GDP of $3.7 trillion.

Here’s a look at the size of every country’s economy in 2023, according to IMF’s estimates.

RankCountryGDP (USD)% of Total
1🇺🇸 U.S.$26,855B25.54%
2🇨🇳 China$19,374B18.43%
3🇯🇵 Japan$4,410B4.19%
4🇩🇪 Germany$4,309B4.10%
5🇮🇳 India$3,737B3.55%
6🇬🇧 UK$3,159B3.00%
7🇫🇷 France$2,923B2.78%
8🇮🇹 Italy$2,170B2.06%
9🇨🇦 Canada$2,090B1.99%
10🇧🇷 Brazil$2,081B1.98%
11🇷🇺 Russia$2,063B1.96%
12🇰🇷 South Korea$1,722B1.64%
13🇦🇺 Australia$1,708B1.62%
14🇲🇽 Mexico$1,663B1.58%
15🇪🇸 Spain$1,492B1.42%
16🇮🇩 Indonesia$1,392B1.32%
17🇳🇱 Netherlands$1,081B1.03%
18🇸🇦 Saudi Arabia$1,062B1.01%
19🇹🇷 Türkiye$1,029B0.98%
20🇨🇭 Switzerland$870B0.83%
21🇹🇼 Taiwan$791B0.75%
22🇵🇱 Poland$749B0.71%
23🇦🇷 Argentina$641B0.61%
24🇧🇪 Belgium$624B0.59%
25🇸🇪 Sweden$599B0.57%
26🇮🇪 Ireland$594B0.57%
27🇹🇭 Thailand$574B0.55%
28🇳🇴 Norway$554B0.53%
29🇮🇱 Israel$539B0.51%
30🇸🇬 Singapore$516B0.49%
31🇦🇹 Austria$515B0.49%
32🇳🇬 Nigeria$507B0.48%
33🇦🇪 UAE$499B0.47%
34🇻🇳 Vietnam$449B0.43%
35🇲🇾 Malaysia$447B0.43%
36🇵🇭 Philippines$441B0.42%
37🇧🇩 Bangladesh$421B0.40%
38🇩🇰 Denmark$406B0.39%
39🇿🇦 South Africa$399B0.38%
40🇪🇬 Egypt$387B0.37%
41🇭🇰 Hong Kong$383B0.36%
42🇮🇷 Iran$368B0.35%
43🇨🇱 Chile$359B0.34%
44🇷🇴 Romania$349B0.33%
45🇨🇴 Colombia$335B0.32%
46🇨🇿 Czech Republic$330B0.31%
47🇫🇮 Finland$302B0.29%
48🇵🇪 Peru$268B0.26%
49🇮🇶 Iraq$268B0.25%
50🇵🇹 Portugal$268B0.25%
51🇳🇿 New Zealand$252B0.24%
52🇰🇿 Kazakhstan$246B0.23%
53🇬🇷 Greece$239B0.23%
54🇶🇦 Qatar$220B0.21%
55🇩🇿 Algeria$206B0.20%
56🇭🇺 Hungary$189B0.18%
57🇰🇼 Kuwait$165B0.16%
58🇪🇹 Ethiopia$156B0.15%
59🇺🇦 Ukraine$149B0.14%
60🇲🇦 Morocco$139B0.13%
61🇸🇰 Slovak
Republic
$128B0.12%
62🇪🇨 Ecuador$121B0.12%
63🇩🇴 Dominican
Republic
$121B0.12%
64🇵🇷 Puerto Rico$121B0.11%
65🇰🇪 Kenya$118B0.11%
66🇦🇴 Angola$118B0.11%
67🇴🇲 Oman$105B0.10%
68🇬🇹 Guatemala$102B0.10%
69🇧🇬 Bulgaria$101B0.10%
70🇻🇪 Venezuela$97B0.09%
71🇺🇿 Uzbekistan$92B0.09%
72🇱🇺 Luxembourg$87B0.08%
73🇹🇿 Tanzania$85B0.08%
74🇹🇲 Turkmenistan$83B0.08%
75🇭🇷 Croatia$79B0.08%
76🇱🇹 Lithuania$78B0.07%
77🇨🇷 Costa Rica$78B0.07%
78🇺🇾 Uruguay$77B0.07%
79🇵🇦 Panama$77B0.07%
80🇨🇮 Côte d'Ivoire$77B0.07%
81🇷🇸 Serbia$74B0.07%
82🇧🇾 Belarus$74B0.07%
83🇦🇿 Azerbaijan$70B0.07%
84🇨🇩 DRC$69B0.07%
85🇸🇮 Slovenia$68B0.06%
86🇬🇭 Ghana$67B0.06%
87🇲🇲 Myanmar$64B0.06%
88🇯🇴 Jordan$52B0.05%
89🇹🇳 Tunisia$50B0.05%
90🇺🇬 Uganda$50B0.05%
91🇨🇲 Cameroon$49B0.05%
92🇱🇻 Latvia$47B0.05%
93🇸🇩 Sudan$47B0.04%
94🇱🇾 Libya$46B0.04%
95🇧🇴 Bolivia$46B0.04%
96🇧🇭 Bahrain$45B0.04%
97🇵🇾 Paraguay$43B0.04%
98🇳🇵 Nepal$42B0.04%
99🇪🇪 Estonia$42B0.04%
100🇲🇴 Macao$36B0.03%
101🇭🇳 Honduras$34B0.03%
102🇸🇻 El Salvador$34B0.03%
103🇵🇬 Papua
New Guinea
$33B0.03%
104🇸🇳 Senegal$31B0.03%
105🇨🇾 Cyprus$31B0.03%
106🇰🇭 Cambodia$31B0.03%
107🇿🇼 Zimbabwe$30B0.03%
108🇿🇲 Zambia$29B0.03%
109🇮🇸 Iceland$29B0.03%
110🇧🇦 Bosnia &
Herzegovina
$28B0.03%
111🇹🇹 Trinidad
& Tobago
$28B0.03%
112🇬🇪 Georgia$28B0.03%
113🇭🇹 Haiti$27B0.03%
114🇦🇲 Armenia$24B0.02%
115🇬🇳 Guinea$23B0.02%
116🇧🇫 Burkina Faso$21B0.02%
117🇲🇱 Mali$21B0.02%
118🇬🇦 Gabon$20B0.02%
119🇦🇱 Albania$20B0.02%
120🇲🇿 Mozambique$20B0.02%
121🇧🇼 Botswana$20B0.02%
122🇾🇪 Yemen$20B0.02%
123🇲🇹 Malta$19B0.02%
124🇧🇯 Benin$19B0.02%
125🇵🇸 West Bank
& Gaza
$19B0.02%
126🇳🇮 Nicaragua$17B0.02%
127🇯🇲 Jamaica$17B0.02%
128🇲🇳 Mongolia$17B0.02%
129🇳🇪 Niger$17B0.02%
130🇬🇾 Guyana$16B0.02%
131🇲🇬 Madagascar$16B0.02%
132🇲🇩 Moldova$16B0.02%
133🇧🇳 Brunei Darussalam$16B0.01%
134🇲🇰 North Macedonia$15B0.01%
135🇬🇶 Equatorial Guinea$15B0.01%
136🇲🇺 Mauritius$15B0.01%
137🇧🇸 Bahamas$14B0.01%
138🇱🇦 Laos$14B0.01%
139🇳🇦 Namibia$13B0.01%
140🇷🇼 Rwanda$13B0.01%
141🇨🇩 Congo$13B0.01%
142🇹🇯 Tajikistan$13B0.01%
143🇰🇬 Kyrgyz Republic$12B0.01%
144🇹🇩 Chad$12B0.01%
145🇲🇼 Malawi$11B0.01%
146🇲🇷 Mauritania$11B0.01%
147🇽🇰 Kosovo$10B0.01%
148🇹🇬 Togo$9B0.01%
149🇸🇴 Somalia$9B0.01%
150🇲🇪 Montenegro$7B0.01%
151🇸🇸 South Sudan$7B0.01%
152🇲🇻 Maldives$7B0.01%
153🇧🇧 Barbados$6B0.01%
154🇫🇯 Fiji$5B0.01%
155🇸🇿 Eswatini$5B0.00%
156🇱🇷 Liberia$4B0.00%
157🇩🇯 Djibouti$4B0.00%
158🇦🇩 Andorra$4B0.00%
159🇦🇼 Aruba$4B0.00%
160🇸🇱 Sierra Leone$4B0.00%
161🇸🇷 Suriname$3B0.00%
162🇧🇮 Burundi$3B0.00%
163🇧🇿 Belize$3B0.00%
164🇨🇫 Central
African Republic
$3B0.00%
165🇧🇹 Bhutan$3B0.00%
166🇪🇷 Eritrea$3B0.00%
167🇱🇸 Lesotho$3B0.00%
168🇨🇻 Cabo Verde$2B0.00%
169🇬🇲 Gambia$2B0.00%
170🇱🇨 Saint Lucia$2B0.00%
171🇹🇱 East Timor$2B0.00%
172🇸🇨 Seychelles$2B0.00%
173🇬🇼 Guinea-Bissau$2B0.00%
174🇦🇬 Antigua & Barbuda$2B0.00%
175🇸🇲 San Marino$2B0.00%
176🇸🇧 Solomon Islands$2B0.00%
177🇰🇲 Comoros$1B0.00%
178🇬🇩 Grenada$1B0.00%
179🇻🇺 Vanuatu$1B0.00%
180🇰🇳 Saint Kitts
& Nevis
$1B0.00%
181🇻🇨 Saint Vincent
& the Grenadines
$1B0.00%
182🇼🇸 Samoa$1B0.00%
183🇩🇲 Dominica$1B0.00%
184🇸🇹 São Tomé
& Príncipe
$1B0.00%
185🇹🇴 Tonga$1B0.00%
186🇫🇲 Micronesia$0.5B0.00%
187🇲🇭 Marshall Islands$0.3B0.00%
188🇵🇼 Palau$0.3B0.00%
189🇰🇮 Kiribati$0.2B0.00%
190🇳🇷 Nauru$0.2B0.00%
191🇹🇻 Tuvalu$0.1B0.00%

Note: Projections for Afghanistan, Lebanon, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Syria are missing from IMF’s database for 2023.

Here are the largest economies for each region of the world.

  • Africa: Nigeria ($506.6 billion)
  • Asia: China ($19.4 trillion)
  • Europe: Germany ($4.3 trillion)
  • Middle East: Saudi Arabia ($1.1 trillion)
  • North & Central America: U.S. ($26.9 trillion)
  • Oceania: Australia ($1.7 trillion)
  • South America: Brazil ($2.1 trillion)

Ranked: 2023’s Shrinking Economies

In fact, 29 economies are projected to shrink from their 2022 sizes, leading to nearly $500 billion in lost output.

A bar chart showing the amount of nominal GDP shrinkage for several countries.

Russia will see the biggest decline, with a projected $150 billion contraction this year. This is equal to about one-third of total decline of all 29 countries with shrinking economies.

Egypt (-$88 billion) and Canada (-$50 billion) combined make up another one-third of lost output.

In Egypt’s case, the drop can be partly explained by the country’s currency (Egyptian pound), which has dropped in value against the U.S. dollar by about 50% since mid-2022.

Russia and Canada are some of the world’s largest oil producers and the oil price has fallen since 2022. A further complication for Russia is that the country has been forced to sell oil at a steep discount because of Western sanctions.

Here are the projected changes in GDP for all countries facing year-over-year declines:

CountryRegion2022–23 Change (USD)2022–23 Change (%)
🇷🇺 RussiaEurope-$152.65B-6.9%
🇪🇬 EgyptAfrica-$88.12B-18.5%
🇨🇦 CanadaNorth America-$50.17B-2.3%
🇸🇦 Saudi ArabiaMiddle East-$46.25B-4.2%
🇧🇩 BangladeshAsia-$39.69B-8.6%
🇳🇴 NorwayEurope-$25.16B-4.3%
🇰🇼 KuwaitMiddle East-$19.85B-10.8%
🇴🇲 OmanMiddle East-$9.77B-8.5%
🇨🇴 ColombiaSouth America-$9.25B-2.7%
🇦🇪 UAEMiddle East-$8.56B-1.7%
🇿🇦 South AfricaAfrica-$6.69B-1.6%
🇬🇭 GhanaAfrica-$6.22B-8.5%
🇶🇦 QatarMiddle East-$5.91B-2.6%
🇦🇴 AngolaAfrica-$3.54B-2.9%
🇿🇼 ZimbabweAfrica-$3.09B-9.4%
🇺🇦 UkraineEurope-$2.79B-1.8%
🇸🇩 SudanAfrica-$2.72B-5.5%
🇮🇶 IraqMiddle East-$2.47B-0.9%
🇹🇱 East TimorAsia-$1.67B-45.7%
🇬🇦 GabonAfrica-$1.60B-7.3%
🇬🇶 Equatorial GuineaAfrica-$1.35B-8.2%
🇲🇼 MalawiAfrica-$1.24B-9.9%
🇱🇦 LaosAsia-$1.21B-7.9%
🇧🇳 BruneiAsia-$1.13B-6.8%
🇾🇪 YemenMiddle East-$1.12B-5.4%
🇸🇸 South SudanAfrica-$0.86B-10.9%
🇧🇮 BurundiAfrica-$0.66B-16.9%
🇸🇱 Sierra LeoneAfrica-$0.42B-10.6%
🇸🇷 SurinameSouth America-$0.05B-1.4%

The presence of Saudi Arabia, Norway, Kuwait, and Oman in the top 10 biggest GDP contractions further highlights the potential impact on GDP for oil-producing countries, according to the IMF’s projections.

More recently, producers have been cutting supply in an effort to boost prices, but concerns of slowing global oil demand in the wake of a subdued Chinese economy (the world’s second-largest oil consumer), have kept oil prices lower than in 2022 regardless.

The Footnote on GDP Forecasts

While organizations like the IMF have gotten fairly good at GDP forecasting, it’s still worth remembering that these are projections and assumptions made at the beginning of the year that may not hold true by the end of 2023.

For example, JP Morgan has already changed their forecast for China’s 2023 real GDP growth six times in as many months after expectations of broad-based pandemic-recovery spending did not materialize in the country.

The key takeaway from IMF’s projections for 2023 GDP growth rests on how well countries restrict inflation without stifling growth, all amidst tense liquidity conditions.

Where Does This Data Come From?

Source: The International Monetary Fund’s Datamapper which uses projections made in the April 2023 World Economic Outlook report.

Note: Projections for Afghanistan, Lebanon, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Syria are missing from the IMF’s database. Furthermore, all figures used in the article, unless specified, are nominal GDP numbers and rates.

 

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